Google

Category
 
Recent Entries
 
Archives
 
Links
 
Visitors

You have 1291104 hits.

 
Latest Comments


 
Archives
You are currently viewing archive for July 2009
Posted By Peter Bentley
Today I was a guest on The Moncrieff Show on the Irish radio station Newstalk. Nice to have a chat with an enthusiastic host. We also had another book review, this time in reFRESH magazine. It was written by book editor Janet Tester which seems like a very appropriate name. She clearly has good taste too.


 
Posted By Peter Bentley
My publicist sent me a new review for The Undercover Scientist that I missed recently, in the Independent newspaper. It's triggered a new batch of radio interviews - I'll talk on an Irish show on Wednesday.


 
Posted By Peter Bentley
Less than a week since it was released and my iphone application iStethoscope Pro has hit the number 1 ranking in Paid Applications in its category (Medical Apps) of Apple's AppStore. My cardiologist collaborators continue to be hugely enthusiastic.

I've just prepared a new minor release of the app - version 1.01. This will have a new "Medical Trial" Setting to enable users to automatically email their heart audio to the Medical School of the University of Minnesota Duluth. There a research group led by Glenn Nordehn will gather the audio and use machine learning to analyze the data, with the eventual aim of predicting heart conditions using software. In the meantime I'll be working on a related iphone app, designed to train users to auscultate and understand how to listen and read the spectrogram produced by iStethoscope Pro.


 
Posted By Peter Bentley
On my recent travels I managed to miss a shuttle bus leaving Miami Airport and was left waiting for an hour. To pass the time I dropped by the airport bookstore. Like similar visits to the stores in NY, Washington and Montreal, it was nice to see a little bit of me was already sitting there on a shelf.


 
Posted By Peter Bentley
On Monday I hosted the July cafe scientifique at the Royal Institution as usual. This month we were talking about science journalism and science. We had two panel speakers, Mark Henderson of the Times, and Gareth Mitchell from BBC radio. (We also had Alex Mansfield, someone I worked with at the beginning of the year on the Letter to Darwin radio programme, in the audience.)

It was a nice discussion, the journalists arguing that accuracy of reporting was the only way to maintain a reputation and hence sales. But it was revealed that, as in politics, the number of science degrees was exceedingly low in journalism. I'm biassed of course, but wouldn't it be nice if those who set policy or communicated on a topic actually had some background in the area?